Raid

SC Johnson® Institute of Insect Science for Family Health

The SC Johnson® Institute of Insect Science for Family Health in Racine, Wisconsin, USA, is one of the world’s largest private urban entomology research facilities.

A smiling entomologist, wearing a lab coat and glasses, standing in a lab of the SC Johnson® Institute of Insect Science for Family Health

Established in 1957, researchers at the SC Johnson® Institute of Insect Science for Family Health have been dedicated to insect science research for over 60 years.

The SC Johnson® researchers at the IISFH strive to better understand and manage insects that may carry diseases and since the 1950s, they have studied and advanced the sciences of insect biology, physiology, ecology, behavior, toxicology, infestation management, urban pest control, and insect-borne disease prevention.

The Institute of Insect Science for Family Health is divided into two major functional areas. Product evaluation and development is where researchers develop insecticides (products that kill insects) as well as personal and area repellents (products that repel mosquitoes, ticks, biting flies, and fleas.) The second area at the Institute is applied entomology research where researchers study insect behavior and new technologies that may eventually lead to the development of new products.

Both areas are supported by a world-class insect-rearing facility known as the Insectary, where scientists raise millions of insects, spanning nearly 20 different species.

Another role of the Institute is to educate the public worldwide about insects and the important role they play in the earth’s ecosystem, helping develop products and sharing knowledge that would allow humanity to live in harmony with insects.

SC Johnson® is committed to global innovation, insect science research leadership, and advancement of family health. The SC Johnson® scientists are passionate about what they do, and they continue to help families worldwide learn about how to use pest control products and how to protect themselves against some of the more common insect-borne diseases.